3 Ways to be Miserable

3 Ways to be Miserable

Written By Cristina DiMeglio

BeIf-you-are-waiting-each-morning-for-happiness-quotesing Miserable is easy.

It takes no effort to be miserable.

Why?

You live your life at “face-value.” It means, you willingly subscribe to almost any belief that puts you in a position to be de-valued.

It’s almost as if being miserable is what the “cool kids” are doing these days. All you have to do is check out social media! People LOVE to dish out the negativity, they love the community that comes together around it! It’s a giant Kumbaya-fest of haters who seem to think collectively their power of complaints will, I don’t know, change the dynamics of their shitty lives.

Crazy, right?

I mean why buy a new boat if you’re comfortable plugging the holes in your sinking one? It’s just a matter of time before you run out of putty and you’re in a position to swim for land. It all comes to a head. Eventually.  What will be your breaking point?  Is it worth losing out on years of your life to play the victim card, get a momentary high perhaps on the “attention” you receive from pity, and fall back into your cave of shame?

If your life is lived by these three things, you may want to “check in” with yourself and gauge where you are, where you want to be, and what baggage you need to let go of to make your journey more pleasant.  We get one shot at life. It’s not a rehearsal. It’s a waste to live it in bullshit and misery.

1. Whine and Complain
Ring the alarms! There’s always time to complain. Look at the plethora of items to incite misery: weather, people, the stock market, expired peanut butter… all of these things, which we have absolutely no control over.

Have you been around someone who, no matter what you say, utilize your salutation as an invitation to complain? I know I certainly have and its not pleasant. In fact, it is so energetically draining to be in the midst of someone who just wants to invoke pity from you.  Venting to your friends is one thing, but there are those who take it to a whole other level and it feels pretty icky afterwards.

2. Judge Everyone
I see this WAY more than I would like. Many people have a habit of pointing fingers and making judgments about everyone.  It’s a war of perspectives and limited ones at that.

If you’re putting everyone’s needs before your own, it’s because somewhere inside of you, you believe others are more important than you. And when being a martyr, be sure everyone around you knows all the sacrifices you’re making is for the “good” of others.

3. Speak Without Integrity
This is very important to be conscientious of, as no one is perfect, but speak the truth often and put “weight” into your words. If you say your going to do something, please do it. If you say your going to go to the gym, get your bottom there and on the treadmill. If you say you will follow up with a client in 24 hours, do what you said you are going to do.  Time is of the essence and frankly, if you can’t trust your own word is golden, how can anyone else respect and honor you? The words that come out of your mouth are just as important as the actions that follow.  Trust me on this one.

I know I can blog a little sarcastic at times, but I promise it’s all out of LOVE.  I really want you to recognize just some of the things we keep doing, socially and professionally, so you can STOP participating in the madness of misery. Creating misery is a pervasive behavior and for most, it’s habitual. If “like” attracts “like,” then how much misery are you bringing into your lives right now? Yes…acknowledge your part in the collective misery, and choose to be happy instead.

How do you do it?

Live Courageously.

Speak up and speak lovingly, to yourself and to others.

Live IN Gratitude. Instead of dishing complaints, give compliments!

To that end, I leave you with this quote:

There is a time in every man’s education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance, that imitation is suicide, that he must take himself for better or for worse, as his portion. -Ralph Waldo Emerson, Self Reliance.

 

 

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